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Monthly Archives: March 2013

CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Pinewoods Treefrog (Hyla femoralis)

Shown hiding in Florida Native Plant: Saw Palmetto (Serenoa repens).
Eats ants, beetles, crickets, flies, moths, spiders, wasps, and other small invertebrates.

Learn: http://ufwildlife.ifas.ufl.edu/frogs/pinewoodstreefrog.shtml

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Southeastern Five-lined Skink (Plestiodon spp. likely inexpectatus)

Quick sleek lizard that eats beetles, wood roaches, grasshoppers and other insects you’d likely be glad to be rid of. You can generally find them warming in the early morning sun. Juveniles have blue tails. This may be Plestiodon fasciatus although it seems their range ends in northern Florida.

Learn: https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/wildlife/information/southeastern-five-lined-skink/

http://www.floridiannature.com/Skinks.htm

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Florida woods cockroach (Eurycotis floridana)

Some people refer to this as a palmetto bug, but it isn’t generally a house invader as are some others that also are called by that common name. Generally found in out buildings such as sheds and well enclosures.

Apparently the light color margins indicates that this is a nymph. Personally, if this is a baby, I really don’t want to run into the adult. 🙂

One of the few bugs that really freaks me out. 😮

Learn: http://entnemdept.ifas.ufl.edu/creatures/urban/roaches/florida_woods_cockroach.htm

Insect has a “gland that produces a secretion with 40 components, including acids, ether and the smelly substance known from stink bugs. It can squirt the stuff 6 inches or more. In your eyes, it would be excruciatingly painful. Mice and lizards don’t like it either.” source: http://www.livescience.com/11330-secret-weapons.html

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Tortricid Moth (Sparganothis distincta)

a type of leaf roller in the Tortricidae Family.

Superfamily Tortricoidea – Tortricid Moths
Family Tortricidae – Tortricid Moths
Subfamily Tortricinae
Tribe Sparganothini

larval host Solidago sp. source: Tortricinae LACM Index North America
http://www.tortricidae.com/foodplant_database.pdf

Learn: https://bugguide.net/node/view/170975

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Damselfly (Zygoptera)

Damelflies are beneficial in both adult and larval stages as they control insect populations. In addition, larvae (naiads) are aquatic and feed on small fish and tadpoles and other aquatic life.

I’ve given up trying to identify blue damsels.

Shown on American White Waterlily Pad (Nymphaea odorata)

Learn: http://www.uky.edu/Ag/CritterFiles/casefile/insects/damselflies/damselflies.htm

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