Archive

Monthly Archives: July 2014

CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Atlantic Bluet Damselfly (Enallagma doubledayi)

Damselflies are predatory in both adult and larval stages.

Range: http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/distr/insects/dfly/usa/84.htm

Diet: insects, aquatic larvae such as mosquitoes

Learn: http://www.odonatacentral.org/index.php/FieldGuideAction.get/id/42985

Dorsal:

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Palamedes Swallowtail Butterfly (Papilio palamedes)

Seems to be particularly fond of red flowers for nectar.

Larval host: Red bay (Persea borbonia), swamp bay (Persea palustris), silk bay (Persea humilis)

Learn: http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/wildflower/completebutterflydata.asp?id=2

Shown on Florida Native Plant: Coral honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens)

My take: http://web.archive.org/web/20150316163152/http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/will-the-palamedes-swallowtail-butterfly-survive.html

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Bluegill Fish (Lepomis macrochirus)

Bluegill is in the sunfish family. This guy was swimming along with a softshell turtle and was feeding on some native Mermaidweed (Proserpinaca pectinata) before he came to the top for a picture.

They are an important food source for larger fish predators, including bass and other larger fish, birds (waterfowl, herons), turtles, mammals…including humans.

Range: http://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/FactSheet.aspx?speciesID=385

Diet: insects, smaller fish, aquatic larvae such as mosquitoes, vegetation

Learn: http://www.fcps.edu/islandcreekes/ecology/bluegill.htm

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Southeastern Five-lined Skink (Plestiodon inexpectatus)

Quick, sleek lizard. You can generally find them warming in the early morning sun. Juveniles have blue tails.
Note: This may be P. fasciatus although it seems their range ends in northern Florida; map: http://maps.iucnredlist.org/map.html?id=64227

Diet: beetles, wood roaches, grasshoppers and other insects

Preyed upon by large birds, (crows, kestrels, hawks), foxes, raccoons, opossums, skunks, shrews, moles, domestic cats, and snakes.

Learn: http://srelherp.uga.edu/lizards/eumine.htm

My take: http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/hep-herpetology.html

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