Archive

Monthly Archives: January 2015

CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Stink Bug (Thyanta perditor)

One of the Red shouldered stink bugs which can be pests since they suck juices from plants.

There are many different species of stink bugs and they can be difficult to identify, but the red shoulders with points and speckled wings lead me to this species.

Learn more: http://www.uky.edu/Ag/CritterFiles/casefile/insects/bugs/stinkbugs/stinkbugs.htm#whatis

Shown on Florida Native Plant: Spanish Needles (Bidens alba)

Stink bugs are eaten by spiders and the freeloader flies will latch on to feast as well.

My take on the stink bug family: https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2019/03/28/it-just-stinksor-does-it/

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Green Anole (Anolis carolinensis)

This Florida native lizard was braving the whipping winds as it clung to the stem of some spanish needles waiting for lunch.

Diet: insects, spiders

Learn more: http://srelherp.uga.edu/lizards/anocar.htm

Shown on Florida Native Plant: Spanish Needles (Bidens alba) amid Blackberry (Rubus sp.)

My take: https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2016/06/20/nature-knows-bestthe-little-lizard-who-could/

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Sweat Bee (Halictus poeyi)

One of the NATIVE non-metallic bees. Tiny. As can be seen by the legs, gathers quite a bit of pollen.

“Sweat bees are very important pollinators for many wildflowers and crops, including stone fruits, pomme fruits, alfalfa and sunflower. Sweat bee populations can be encouraged with wildflower plantings and by providing nesting areas. Halictids typically nest in bare soil located in a sunny location. Minimum tillage and insecticide use will help to increase populations of Halictidae and other soil nesting bees.”

Learn more: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/misc/bees/halictid_bees.htm

Shown on Florida Native Plant: Spanish Needles (Bidens alba)

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Fruit Fly (Dioxyna sp. likely picciola)

Family: Tephritidae

“Fruit flies (Tephritidae) are the most agriculturally important family of flies. Some species are pests, together causing billions of dollars in losses annually, whereas other species are beneficial biological control agents of weeds.” source: http://www.sel.barc.usda.gov/Diptera/tephriti/tephriti.htm

Learn: http://susanleachsnyder.com/GopherTortoisePreserve/InsectOrderDiptera.html#Diox

Shown on Florida Native Plant: Spanish Needles (Bidens alba)

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)

Even though this guy was trying to hide in the elderberry, the males are hard to miss with their bright red feathers. Ladies are a bit more subdued with a reddish brown coloring.

Diet: mainly seeds and fruit. Insects are also a part of the diet and nestlings REQUIRE insects.

Easily attracted to bird feeders (especially if sunflower seeds are provided), but why bother when you can provide natural food from your native plant garden. Personal feeding experience: Bidens alba, bluestem grasses, elderberry, muscadine grape, winged sumac, beautyberry, blackberry, bayberry and more.

Learn: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Cardinal/id

Shown on Florida Native Plant: AMERICAN ELDER; ELDERBERRY (Sambucus nigra L. subsp. canadensis)

My take: https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2016/11/03/gardening-payoff/

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Longjawed Orbweaver Spider (Tetragnatha sp.)

One of the Orb weaver spiders often found on plants along the littoral zones of ponds or similar bodies of water. This genus can become thinner than the width of a blade of grass when they rest with their legs held straight out, blending in with their habitat. Nearly impossible to see.

Learn: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in017

Shown on Florida Native Plant: dried debris of bluestem grasses

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Bella Moth (Utetheisa ornatrix)

diurnal moth.

Learn: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/beneficial/leps/bella_moth.htm

Larval host: (Crotalaria spp.) which in my yard is the Florida native RABBITBELLS (C. rotundifolia)

Shown on Florida Native Plant: dried debris remains of some Partridge Pea plants

My take: What’s in a day?

http://web.archive.org/web/20121006173112/http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/what%e2%80%99s-in-a-day.html

Take 2: Half Hidden Beauty in the Garden
http://web.archive.org/web/20120702071508/http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/half-hidden-beauty-in-the-garden.html

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