Archive

Monthly Archives: January 2015

CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Stink Bug (Thyanta perditor)

One of the Red shouldered stink bugs which can be pests since they suck juices from plants.

There are many different species of stink bugs and they can be difficult to identify, but the red shoulders with points and speckled wings lead me to this species.

Learn more: http://zipcodezoo.com/Animals/T/Thyanta_perditor/

Shown on Florida Native Plant: Spanish Needles (Bidens alba)

Stink bugs are eaten by spiders and the freeloader flies will latch on to feast as well.

My take on the stink bug family: http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/it-just-stinksor-does-it.html

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Green Anole (Anolis carolinensis)

This Florida native lizard was braving the whipping winds as it clung to the stem of some spanish needles waiting for lunch.

Diet: insects, spiders

Learn more: http://srelherp.uga.edu/lizards/anocar.htm

Shown on Florida Native Plant: Spanish Needles (Bidens alba) amid Blackberry (Rubus sp.)

My take: https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2016/06/20/nature-knows-bestthe-little-lizard-who-could/

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: White Peacock Butterfly (Anartia jatrophae)

Learn more: http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/wildflower/completebutterflydata.asp?id=31

Larval host: water hyssop (Bacopa monnieri), frogfruit (Phyla nodiflora)

Shown on Florida Native Plant: Spanish Needles (Bidens alba)

My take: http://web.archive.org/web/20140328200034/http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/when-a-peacock-isnt-a-bird.html

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Sweat Bee (Halictus poeyi)

One of the NATIVE non-metallic bees. Tiny. As can be seen by the legs, gathers quite a bit of pollen.

“Sweat bees are very important pollinators for many wildflowers and crops, including stone fruits, pomme fruits, alfalfa and sunflower. Sweat bee populations can be encouraged with wildflower plantings and by providing nesting areas. Halictids typically nest in bare soil located in a sunny location. Minimum tillage and insecticide use will help to increase populations of Halictidae and other soil nesting bees.”

Learn more: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/misc/bees/halictid_bees.htm

Shown on Florida Native Plant: Spanish Needles (Bidens alba)

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