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Monthly Archives: March 2019

CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Leaf Beetle (Oulema sp. possibly collaris)

Leaf Beetle (Oulema sp. possibly collaris)

New to my buggy life list.

Family Chrysomelidae – Leaf Beetles
Subfamily Criocerinae
Tribe Lemini

Larval host:  Commelinaceae, e.g., spiderwort – Tradescantia spp.    This one was directly above some introduced Dayflower which is in that same family. If it is munching that I would be thrilled.

Learn: https://bugguide.net/node/view/196982

7 species in this genus listed on the Florida Beetle Checklist.

Shown on Florida Native Plant: Bidens alba

Leaf Beetle (Oulema sp. possibly collaris)

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Large Crane Fly (Brachypremna dispellens)

This very large fella (gal?) was dancing among the Florida native Blackberry (Rubus sp.) brambles

Craneflies are beneficial decomposers. They have legs that go on for days.

Family Tipulidae – Large Crane Flies
Subfamily Tipulinae

Learn: http://www.uky.edu/Ag/CritterFiles/casefile/insects/flies/craneflies/craneflies.htm

Key:  http://web.archive.org/web/20141221002551/http://iz.carnegiemnh.org/cranefly/idkeys.htm

My take: https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2017/12/04/mistaken-mosquito/

Large Crane Fly (Brachypremna dispellens)

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Brown Stink Bug (Euschistus sp.)

When it comes to stink bugs, there are pests and beneficials. Spiders will eat either one. Shown is a pest variety.

“The eggs and nymphs of stink bugs often suffer high mortality from parasites, predators and pathogens.”

Learn: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/veg/bean/brown_stink_bug.htm

Shown on Florida Native Plant: : Bidens alba

My take: https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2019/03/28/it-just-stinksor-does-it/

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Red-banded Hairstreak Butterfly (Calycopis cecrops)

 

Eggs are laid on fallen leaves. If you are overly tidy in the garden, you wont attract this beauty.

Only Florida butterfly to utilize detritus (leaf litter) as larval food from wax myrtle (Morella cerifera), sumac (Rhus spp.) and the highly invasive and prohibited (in FL) Brazilian pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius).

Learn: http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/wildflower/completebutterflydata.asp?id=21

Shown on Florida Native Plant:  SOUTHERN BAYBERRY; WAX MYRTLE (Morella cerifera);

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Diamondback Moth (Plutella xylostella)

This guy (gal?) was hanging out in the shower which seems odd because they apparently have an aversion to rain and sprinklers.

Can damage cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower crops but in broccoli and cauliflower, the damage is indirect because they feed on leaves and not on flower head.

Rain plays a major roll in control.

Learn: http://web.entomology.cornell.edu/shelton/veg-insects-global/english/dbm.html

Diadegma insulare, a parasitoid wasp is an effective biological control for caterpillars, but if you use any pesticides it will kill the wasp growing in the larva and  defeat the effectiveness.

Diamondback Moth (Plutella xylostella)

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