Archive

Arachnids (Spiders)

CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Tropical Orb Weaver Spider (Eriophora ravilla) juvenile

Eriophora ravilla

This young spider was sitting in the center of the seedhead of Florida native Bidens alba. This should give you an idea of just how tiny a spider it was.  The bright green coloring which is an attribute of juveniles is what caught my eye.

Learn: http://entomology.ifas.ufl.edu/creatures/misc/spiders/tropical_orb_weaver.htm

Learn more: http://bugguide.net/node/view/24094

###

Advertisements

CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Green Lynx Spider (Peucetia viridans) Pair

These spiders do not construct a web capturing prey by grabbing it when it gets close. It will capture pest insects but also will be found with pollinators in its clutches which may upset some, but Ive seen it with stink bugs and leaffooted bugs and similar so it is quite beneficial in my book.

Learn: http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/beneficials/beneficial-48_green_lynx_spider.htm

Learn more: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/beneficial/green_lynx_spider.htm

and more: http://bugguide.net/node/view/2032

Shown on Florida Native Plant: Bidens alba

My take: https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2017/10/07/and-in-this-corneractive-arachnids/

My take 2: Lynx Spiders: Its a boy and a girl and a boy etc.
http://osceolaflgardenblahblahblog.blogspot.com/2010/10/lynx-spiders-its-boy-and-girl-and-boy.html

###

CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Crab Spider (Mecaphesa sp.)

Tiny. a.k.a. Flower spider. Often will take on the color of the flower they are using to lie in wait for prey.

Learn: http://www.uky.edu/Ag/CritterFiles/casefile/spiders/crab/crab.htm

several in the crab spider family are very similar. You can distinguish them by the eye configurations.
Learn: http://bugguide.net/node/view/38099

Shown on Florida Native Plant: Bidens alba

###

CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Tropical Orb Weaver Spider (Eriophora ravilla)

I nearly walked through a very large web where this spider was dangling. It was built between a Chickasaw Plum and a natural area of grapes/saw palmetto which are about 8-10 feet or more apart.

Learn: http://entomology.ifas.ufl.edu/creatures/misc/spiders/tropical_orb_weaver.htm

Learn more: http://bugguide.net/node/view/24094

Had quite a cache of prey:

###

CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY:  Huntsman Spider (Heteropoda venatoria)

Rather LARGE spider as spiders go.  Not the best photo, but it was dark when found hanging out on the patio.

Learn: http://bugguide.net/node/view/772595/bgimage

“It is not a dangerous spider, but a locally painful bite, sometimes with noticeable swelling, can be delivered to any human who carelessly handles a pantropical huntsman spider or accidentally traps it, for example, in a shoe.”  source: source: http://www.entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/urban/spiders/giant_crab_spider.htm

Could my patio be on YELP as a good place for a latenight snack?  Just to the left of the spider was a Southern Toad for waiting for prey.

 

From July 2015 on the side of my trashcan:

 

###

CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY:  Cribellate Orb Weaver Spider (Uloborus sp.)

Cribellate Orb Weaver Spider (Uloborus sp.)

New to my buggy life list.  Very tiny. This one has brushes of hairs on front tibiae which would indicate it is female.

Learn: http://bugguide.net/node/view/1956

Species in the Uloboridae family do “not possess venom glands, relying instead on cribellate, a fuzzy non sticky silk that they use to trap and then wrap their prey.” source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uloborus_glomosus

cribellatespiderjan2017

Shown on Florida Native Plant: DOCTORBUSH (Plumbago zeylanica)

cribellatespiderdoctorbushjan2017size

How tiny is this Cribellate Spider? Those are seeds of Florida Native Plumbago zeylanica aka Doctorbush

###