Archive

Birds

CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) juvenile and adult

The adult stopped by this area to snag some Florida native BLACKBERRY (Rubus sp.).

Soon baby followed begging.  I suspect for insects.

Quite vocal, you can always hear them as they glean insects from tree trucks.

diet: mostly insects, but as can be seen here enjoys fruit as well. Nests in dead trees, so leave those SNAGS!

Learn: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-bellied_Woodpecker/lifehistory

My take: https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2016/12/14/pa-rum-pum-pum-pum-little-drummer-bird/

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)

Noisy, but beautiful iridescent coloring especially the males.  This one is likely female. The coloring was less intense.

Learn: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Grackle/id

Shown on Florida Native Plant: AMERICAN ELDER; ELDERBERRY (Sambucus nigra L. subsp. canadensis)

My take: https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2019/05/28/day-of-the-grackle/

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris)

I saw a glimpse of this guy nectaring at my my Florida Native CORAL HONEYSUCKLE (Lonicera sempervirens). Before I could get the camera turned on he flew high into the tree.

To my untrained eye something made me think that it didn’t really look like a ruby-throat which is the only regularly occurring hummingbird listed for Central Florida.  I checked in with my friends from Kissimmee Valley Audubon and they pointed out the bill length, dark head of the male, amount of white and the shape of the tail that are characteristics of the Ruby-Throated.  It may be that most of my prior encounters were seeing females.

Learn: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ruby-throated_Hummingbird/id

Shown on Florida Native Plant: LONGLEAF PINE TREE (Pinus palustris)

closeup photos from encounters in prior years: https://centralfloridacritteroftheday.wordpress.com/2013/04/21/ruby-throated-hummingbird-archilochus-colubris/

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris)

Secretive, colorful bird. This male spent quite a bit of time noshing on the Spanish needle seeds. I took the photo through the kitchen window since any attempt to open the door for a clearer shot would have resulted in the bird flying off.

They are primarily seed eaters, except during breeding season. Migratory in Central Florida.

Learn: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Painted_Bunting/id

Shown on Florida Native Plant: Bidens Alba

My take: http://osceolaflgardenblahblahblog.blogspot.com/2013/01/lousy-photo-fleeting-encounter.html

Take II:  https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2019/01/30/the-bunting-and-the-bidens/

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY:  Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus)

Scavenger. Smaller size, pale head, white legs and wings with only the underside tips showing white distinguish this one from its Turkey Vulture cousin.

Diet: mainly carrion

Shown in Florida native plant: LONGLEAF PINE TREE (Pinus palustris)

Learn: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black_Vulture/id

My take:  Nature’s Cleanup Crew
http://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2016/12/13/natures-cleanup-crew/

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY:   Fish Crow (Corvus ossifragus)

 

Over the past few days I have heard this guy (gal?) calling loudly. Is it a mating call?????? I’ve had a nest in this particular tree two years.  Could they make it three?

The tree overlooks my pond so I suspect it is prime real estate.  Time to practice my drone skills so hopefully I can check out the nestlings without knocking them out of the tree.

Learn: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Fish_Crow/lifehistory

Shown on Florida Native Plant Longleaf Pine  (Pinus palustris)

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: White Ibis (Eudocimus albus)

White Ibis (Eudocimus albus) juveniles under cloudy skies

This juvenile pair was somewhere around my pond but flew up into the Pine when I opened the gate to enter the pond area. I’m guessing they are near adulthood since the beaks were pink.  Their mottled feathers will soon turn all white.

Diet:  mostly insects but also aquatic fauna.

Learn: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/White_Ibis/lifehistory

Shown on Florida Native Plant: LONGLEAF PINE TREE (Pinus palustris)

My take: Treetops to Marsh: The White Ibis

https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2017/03/13/treetops-to-marsh-the-white-ibis/

White Ibis (Eudocimus albus) pretty close to be a full fledged adult as the feathers are close to being all white.

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