Archive

Moths

CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Io Moth (Automeris io)

This beauty was resting on the kitchen door at night.

Adults do not feed

Larval host: multiple plants, “A variety of plants including hackberry (Celtis), willow (Salix), mesquite (Prosopis), redbud (Cercis), currant (Ribes), blackberry (Rubus), and pear (Pyrus)”

Learn/Range: http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Automeris-io

Eyespots are HUGE on the underwings.

Learn: entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/misc/io_moth.htm

Caterpillars are of the “stinging” type:  https://centralfloridacritteroftheday.wordpress.com/2014/08/10/io-moth-caterpillars-automeris-io/

Io Moth (Automeris io)

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Ornate Bella Moth (Utetheisa ornatrix)

a diurnal moth.

Learn: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/beneficial/leps/bella_moth.htm

Larval host: (Crotalaria spp.) which in my yard is the Florida native RABBITBELLS (C. rotundifolia)

Caterpillar: https://centralfloridacritteroftheday.wordpress.com/2014/01/19/ornate-bella-moth-caterpillar-utetheisa-ornatrix/

Shown on Florida Native Plant: TICKSEED (Coreopsis sp.)

My take: Whats in a day?

https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2017/03/12/whats-in-a-day/

Take 2: Half Hidden Beauty in the Garden

https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2019/05/30/half-hidden-beauty-in-the-garden/

Take 3 is about the caterpillar: https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2017/04/29/we-dont-all-eat-leaves-you-know/

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Coffee-loving Pyrausta Moth (Pyrausta tyralis)

Small diurnal moth (flies during the day)

Learn: http://bugguide.net/node/view/26387

native larval hosts:

(a) Bidens alba (source:  personal observation)

(b) WILD COFFEE (Psychotria nervosa)
(source: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/our-science/data/hostplants/search/list.dsml?searchPageURL=index.dsml&Familyqtype=starts+with&Family=&PFamilyqtype=starts+with&PFamily=&Genusqtype=starts+with&Genus=Pyrausta&PGenusqtype=starts+with&PGenus=&Speciesqtype=starts+with&Species=tyralis&PSpeciesqtype=starts+with&PSpecies=&Country=&sort=Family)

Caterpillar: https://centralfloridacritteroftheday.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/coffee-moth-caterpillar/

Shown on Florida Native Plant: TICKSEED (Coreopsis sp.)

My take:  https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2017/03/07/a-dozen-diurnal-moths/

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Tortricid Moth (Sparganothis distincta)

a type of leaf roller in the Tortricidae Family.  Second species in this genus found on the same plants this week.

Superfamily Tortricoidea – Tortricid Moths
Family Tortricidae – Tortricid Moths
Subfamily Tortricinae
Tribe Sparganothini

larval host Solidago sp. source: Tortricinae LACM Index North America
http://www.tortricidae.com/foodplant_database.pdf

Learn: https://bugguide.net/node/view/170975

Shown on Florida Native Plant:  PINEBARREN GOLDENROD (Solidago fistulosa)

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Sparganothis Fruitworm Moth (Sparganothis sulfureana)

Superfamily Tortricoidea (Tortricid Moths)
Family Tortricidae (Tortricid Moths)
Subfamily Tortricinae
Tribe Sparganothini

New to my buggy life list. My encounter was submitted and accepted to add this species to the Osceola county Florida checklist at butterfliesandmoths.org
https://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/sighting_details/1203646

Larval hosts:  Larvae of S. sulfureana are polyphagous and have been recorded feeding on plants in nearly 20 families.

Learn: http://idtools.org/id/leps/tortai/Sparganothis_sulfureana.htm

Shown on Florida Native Plant:  PINEBARREN GOLDENROD (Solidago fistulosa), a larval host.

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Diamondback Moth (Plutella xylostella)

This guy (gal?) was hanging out in the shower which seems odd because they apparently have an aversion to rain and sprinklers.

Can damage cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower crops but in broccoli and cauliflower, the damage is indirect because they feed on leaves and not on flower head.

Rain plays a major roll in control.

Learn: http://web.entomology.cornell.edu/shelton/veg-insects-global/english/dbm.html

Diadegma insulare, a parasitoid wasp is an effective biological control for caterpillars, but if you use any pesticides it will kill the wasp growing in the larva and  defeat the effectiveness.

Diamondback Moth (Plutella xylostella)

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