Archive

True Bugs

CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Saltbush Seed Bug (Ochrimnus mimulus)

New to my buggy life list.  A true bug in the Seed Bugs (Lygaeidae) family, it is a “univoltine seed predator occurring on Baccharis sp. and other Asteraceae (Gould & Sweet 2000)”

Learn:  https://bugguide.net/node/view/254054

Shown on Florida Native Plant GROUNDSEL TREE; SEA MYRTLE (Baccharis halimifolia), a.k.a. Saltbush the preferred larval host.

also reared on solidago and horseweed in a controlled study. source:
http://biostor.org/reference/56136/page/1

“The seed feeding habit of the insect, its oviposition behavior and egg shape appear specifically adapted for Baccharis dwelling.” source: http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1994-THESIS-G696

Ochrimnus mimulus

Select resources:

Gould, Georgianna Grimshaw (1994). The biology and ecology of Ochrimnus mimulus (Stal, 1874): an assessment of its coevolution with Baccharis in Brazos County, Texas. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from http: / /hdl .handle .net /1969 .1 /ETD -TAMU -1994 -THESIS -G696.

Bugguide.net

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Anchor Stink Bug (Stiretrus anchorago)

A predatory stink bug. Beneficial. markings and color can be highly variable.

“feeds on the larvae of beetles, butterflies, and moths, incl. many pest spp. (notably Mexican Bean Beetle and Japanese Beetle)” source: Bugguide.net

Learn: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/beneficial/stiretrus_anchorago.htm

Learn more: http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Stiretrus_anchorago/

Shown on Florida Native Plant: PINEBARREN GOLDENROD (Solidago fistulosa)

My take: It Just Stinks… or Does It?
http://web.archive.org/web/20120723020819/http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/it-just-stinksor-does-it.html

The markings remind me of a monkey face.

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY:  Spined Soldier Bug (Podisus maculiventris)

A predatory stink bug. Beneficial.

Family Pentatomidae – Stink Bugs
Subfamily Asopinae – Predatory Stink Bugs

“…most common predatory stick bug in North America…
This insect is a generalist predator with a broad host range, reportedly attacking 90 insect species over eight orders (De Clercq 2008), including several important economic pests….”

Learn more: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/beneficial/podisus_maculiventris.htm

Shown on Florida Native Plant: Bidens alba

My take: It Just Stinks… or Does It?
http://web.archive.org/web/20120723020819/http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/it-just-stinksor-does-it.html

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Anchor Stink Bug (Stiretrus anchorago)

A predatory stink bug. Beneficial. markings and color can be highly variable.

New to my buggy life list.

“feeds on the larvae of beetles, butterflies, and moths, incl. many pest spp. (notably Mexican Bean Beetle and Japanese Beetle)” source: Bugguide.net

Learn: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/beneficial/stiretrus_anchorago.htm

Learn more: http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Stiretrus_anchorago/

Shown on Florida Native Plant: PINEBARREN GOLDENROD (Solidago fistulosa)

My take: It Just Stinks… or Does It?
http://web.archive.org/web/20120723020819/http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/it-just-stinksor-does-it.html

anchorstinkbuggoldenrodoct2016side

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Leaffooted Bug (Leptoglossus phyllopus)

May be a pest of fruit bearing trees and shrubs but has a place in the circle of life.

eggs feed parasitoids including important pollinators such as chalacid and other parasitic wasps (Gryon spp. and Ooencyrtus sp.)
egg predators include: fire ants and tree crickets.
adult predators include spiders.

Learn: http://sites.duke.edu/dukeinsects/insect-orders/hemiptera/leptoglossus-phyllopus

Mating pair and Learn more: https://centralfloridacritteroftheday.wordpress.com/2016/07/17/leaffooted-bug-leptoglossus-phyllopus-mating/

Shown on Florida Native Plant: BUSHY BLUESTEM (Andropogon sp.)

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Southern Green Stink Bug (Nezara viridula) nymph

This one is quite close to adulthood (5th instar). People worry so much that this insect is a pest because it may munch on edible fruits, but here it is controlling the fruits (seeds) of Shyleaf which can be aggressive in the wrong situation. I rarely see stink bugs or their damage on my edibles…could it be because I give a home to Shyleaf in some areas of the yard so they have an alternative crop? Every creature has it’s place in the circle of life….it’s all about balance. Food for thought.

“Parasites, usually wasps and flies, provide biological control of the southern green stink bug” including a tachinid fly, Trichopoda pennipes which parasitizes adults and nymphs. This guy better watch out. I’ve seen those flies at my place.

Learn: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/veg/bean/southern_green_stink_bug.htm

Shown on Florida Native Plant: SHYLEAF (Aeschynomene americana)

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