Archive

Mammal

CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Eastern Gray Squirrel (Sciurus carlinensis)

squirreloakdec2016

Considered a foe by many. They are cute and their antics are captivating.

“Preferred foods include bark, berries, seeds and acorns.”

Learn: http://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/profiles/mammals/land/squirrels/

Shown on Florida Native Plant: LAUREL OAK; DIAMOND OAK (Quercus laurifolia)

My take: Squirrelly Squirrels in the Garden
http://web.archive.org/web/20140709132013/http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/squirrelly-squirrels-in-the-garden.html

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Marsh Rabbit (Sylvilagus palustris)

Smaller than its more common cousin, the Eastern Cottontail, this bunny swims so will be found where there is water habitat. I have a healthy populations of these cuties who apparently make use of the pond at night although I’ve yet to see them swim.

Diet: They enjoy Florida Native Plants including, but not limited to: cranesbill, plantain or bidens alba, hawkweed leaves, gallberry leaves and elephant foot leaves.

Learn: http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Sylvilagus_palustris/
Learn more: http://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/profiles/mammals/land/marsh-rabbit/

Shown eating Florida Native Plant: Bidens alba

My take:
Hippity Hoppity
http://web.archive.org/web/20120409052222/http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/hippity-hoppity.html

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Eastern Cottontail Rabbit (Sylvilagus floridanus) (baby)

offspring are known as “kits”

Learn: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/animals/mammal/syfl/all.html

Adult photo: https://centralfloridacritteroftheday.wordpress.com/2014/01/08/eastern-cottontail-sylvilagus-floridanus-rabbit-2/

Learn more: http://www.naturalresources.msstate.edu/wildlife/eastern-cottontail-rabbit.asp

Once again one of my English Setter Dogs uncovered a bunny nest. The phrase “dumb bunny” comes to mind as there is 1/2-acre dog free zone in the yard where they could safely nest and yet, often they will set up shop in the 1/2-acre that is designated for the dogs. This time under the Florida native Sycamore tree.

While Tanner has been the culprit in the past, at age 14 he isn’t snooping around so much these days so younger brother Elliot (age 9ish) found the location and let’s just say he’ll have to be on a diet for a few days. 😦

A remaining baby is ok and mom has been back to tend the nest as evidenced by a fresh covering of fur to keep the baby warm. I put up some protective fencing and both dogs are under adult (well, my) supervision until the bunny can fend for him(her)self. I guess it is around 8-10 days old based on the timeline found here: http://www.melbournerabbitclinic.com/wordpress/?page_id=488

My take:

Hippity Hoppity
http://web.archive.org/web/20120409052222/http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/hippity-hoppity.html

Take 2:
Munch Away!
http://web.archive.org/web/20110620001359/http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/munch-away.html

Take 3:
Tragedy and Joy, Tale of a Cottontail
http://web.archive.org/web/20130929191442/http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/tragedy-and-joy-tale-of-a-cottontail.html

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Marsh Rabbit (Sylvilagus palustris)

Smaller than its more common cousin, the Eastern Cottontail. This bunny swims and since I have a good size pond that is probably why there is a healthy population of these cuties at my place.

Diet: They enjoy Florida Native Plants: cranesbill, plantain or bidens alba, hawkweed leaves, gallberry leaves and elephant foot leaves.

Learn: http://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/profiles/mammals/land/marsh-rabbit/

My take: http://web.archive.org/web/20120409052222/http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/hippity-hoppity.html

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Eastern Gray Squirrel (Sciurus carlinensis)

Considered a foe by many. They are cute and their antics are captivating.

Oddly enough, this is the first squirrel I’ve seen on my property and I’ve been here since 2006. I have mostly Longleaf Pines, but an oak sapling was half bent over when I got here so I staked it and it has grown into a beautiful tree which began producing quantities of acorns this year (prior years they were few and far between).

So, the old “plant it and they will come” seems to hold true. Now I hope he doesn’t start being devilish.

Learn: http://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/profiles/mammals/land/squirrels/

Shown on Florida Native Plant: LONGLEAF PINE (Pinus palustris)

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