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Tag Archives: ipm

CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Mole Cricket Hunter Wasp (Larra bicolor)

 

Photos of it using various nectar sources are at the link below under “my take”.

Introduced to the U.S. to control exotic mole cricket pests. Does not target native species, only the exotics.

Learn: http://entomology.ifas.ufl.edu/creatures/beneficial/Larra_wasps.htm

Shown on Florida Native Plant: PINEBARREN GOLDENROD (Solidago fistulosa)

My take: https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2019/02/06/when-an-introduced-species-does-the-job/

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Spotless Lady Beetle larva (Cycloneda sanguinea)

This species of ladybug is native to Florida.
Diet: aphids. The larval stage may be even more beneficial than as adults since the larvae have voracious appetites. If you wash your aphids off your ornamental plants, you remove the food source for the beneficial so they will go elsewhere to reproduce. Be patient.

Keep in mind that Not all ladybugs without spots are native. Harmonia is an introduced species which can outcompete our natives, especially the species in the photo. (source: https://esa.confex.com/esa/2001/techprogram/paper_1422.htm)

If you buy ladybugs, check what species you are introducing. Many sold commercially are non-native species.

Learn: http://susanleachsnyder.com/GopherTortoisePreserve/Insect%20Order%20Coleoptera.html#Spot

Shown on Florida Native Plant: WILD LIME; LIME PRICKLYASH (Zanthoxylum fagara)

a.k.a. Blood-Red Ladybird Beetle

Photos of early instar from 2018: https://centralfloridacritteroftheday.wordpress.com/2018/12/12/spotless-lady-beetle-cycloneda-sanguinea-larvae-newly-hatched/

Photos of adult: https://centralfloridacritteroftheday.wordpress.com/2018/07/30/spotless-lady-beetle-cycloneda-sanguinea-3/

My take: There are Different Types of Ladybugs? (includes side by side photos to tell the exotic from our native species)
http://web.archive.org/web/20150203103908/http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/there-are-different-types-of-ladybugs.html

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Brown Lacewing Larvae (Family Hemerobiidae)

possibly Micromus sp.

As you can see in the photo it is dining on aphids.

“larvae prey on aphids, other soft-bodied insects and mites. ”

Learn/key:  https://entnemdept.ifas.ufl.edu/creatures/beneficial/brown_lacewings.htm

Learn more: http://www.restoringthelandscape.com/2014/10/beneficial-insect-profile-lacewings.html

Shown on Florida Native Plant: GOLDENROD (Solidago sp. likely fistulosa)

another photo:  https://centralfloridacritteroftheday.files.wordpress.com/2019/05/brownlacewinglarvaaphidsgoldenrodapr2019a.jpg

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Colorful Foliage Ground Beetle (Lebia viridis)

This pretty blue beetle is relatively small. Beneficial. Size in photo is deceiving (macros shot)

Family Carabidae – Ground Beetles
Subfamily Harpalinae
Supertribe Harpalitae
Tribe Lebiini
Subtribe Lebiina

genus Predatory on small insects; some parasitize leaf beetle larvae (http://bugguide.net/node/view/12464)

adults in this genus feed on eggs and early instar larvae of prey

More on predatory behavior:
http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102043/00001/5?search=lebia (pg 16)

http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102043/00001/3

Adults minor pollination

Learn: http://bugguide.net/node/view/12464

florida species in this genus http://www.fsca-dpi.org/Coleoptera2/Mike/carabid1.htm

Shown on Florida Native Plant:  PINEBARREN GOLDENROD (Solidago fistulosa)

My take: https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2019/04/28/meet-the-beetles/

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Anchor Stink Bug (Stiretrus anchorago) nymphs

Early Instar

A predatory stink bug. Beneficial. markings and color can be highly variable.

This little guy after scouring the leaves, and stems for aphids and beetle eggs, managed to grab an adult leaf beetle but dropped it since it was a bit larger than him (her?). Definitely good biocontrol

“feeds on the larvae of beetles, butterflies, and moths, incl. many pest spp. (notably Mexican Bean Beetle and Japanese Beetle)” source: Bugguide.net

Learn: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/beneficial/stiretrus_anchorago.htm

Learn more: http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Stiretrus_anchorago/

Shown on Florida Native Plant: PINEBARREN GOLDENROD (Solidago fistulosa)

My take: It Just Stinks… or Does It?

https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2019/03/28/it-just-stinksor-does-it/

Near Adult

Links to photos of adults:

https://centralfloridacritteroftheday.wordpress.com/2016/10/28/anchor-stink-bug-stiretrus-anchorago/

https://centralfloridacritteroftheday.wordpress.com/2017/08/26/anchor-stink-bug/

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Grape Flea Beetle Larvae (Altica sp.)

Hard to get this genus down to species. May be A. torquata or A. chalybea which are said to feed on Vitis sp. in Florida. source:  UF/IFAS

Makes “swiss cheese” of leaves but the plants survive.   “Although these species may become pests because they feed on economically important plants, some flea beetles in this genus may be considered beneficial because of their significant use for bio-control…”

Family Chrysomelidae – Leaf Beetles
Subfamily Galerucinae – Skeletonizing Leaf Beetles and Flea Beetles
Tribe Alticini – Flea Beetles

Shown on Florida Native Plant: MUSCADINE {GRAPE} (Vitis rotundifolia) 

My take:  https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2019/03/02/the-good-in-grapevines/

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CENTRAL FLORIDA CRITTER OF THE DAY: Mole Cricket Hunter Wasp (Larra bicolor)

This one is likely female since it seemed to be on the hunt through the meadow looking for mole crickets which are the larval hosts for its larvae.

Photos of it using various nectar sources are at the link below under “my take”.

Introduced to the U.S. to control exotic mole cricket pests. Does not target native species, only the exotics.

Learn: http://entomology.ifas.ufl.edu/creatures/beneficial/Larra_wasps.htm

My take: https://floridawildlifegardentails.wordpress.com/2019/02/06/when-an-introduced-species-does-the-job/

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